Published: 19 December 2007

Own-account worker households' consumption has grown most in 2001-2006

The consumption expenditure of both farmers and other own-account worker households grew most during 2001-2006, by over one-fifth (22 per cent), while the average growth in households' consumption expenditure was 14 per cent. These data derive from Statistics Finland's 2006 Household Budget Survey, for which data were collected from households in January-February 2006. Roughly 4,000 households participated in the survey.

Many recent studies and statistics have indicated that inequality has increased in Finland. A comparison of households' consumption expenditure in 2001 and 2006 introduces another viewpoint into the discussion, because the results of the Household Budget Survey indicate that consumption expenditure has grown unevenly across different population groups.

On the basis of changes that have taken place in 2001-2006, households can be classified into three groups at different levels of consumption. In 2006 the households of upper-level white-collar workers and other own-account workers than farmers belonged to the group with a high consumption level. In 2001 the consumption expenditure of the households of upper-level white-collar workers was clearly higher than that of other households, but according to the 2006 results, own-account worker households have nearly reached the consumption level of the households of upper-level white-collar workers (Figure 1). Own-account worker households' consumption grew more than average in all divisions of consumption apart from transport and communication, on which these households had already previously used significant amounts of money (Table 1). Own-account worker households' consumption on culture and recreation grew especially clearly, by some 56 per cent, and the share of these expenditure items of total consumption expenditure rose from 9 to 12 per cent.

Figure 1. Consumption expenditure by reference person's socio-economic status in 2001 and 2006 (at 2006 prices, EUR/consumption unit)

The mid-level consumption group was made up more clearly than before of the households of lower-level white-collar and blue-collar workers. The consumption expenditure of blue-collar worker households grew as much as consumption expenditure on average (14 per cent), whereas for lower-level white-collar worker households the growth of consumption expenditure capped at 9 per cent. The consumption expenditure of lower-level white-collar workers was thus closer to that of blue-collar worker households in 2006 than in 2001. Blue-collar worker households spent more money on transport (30 per cent) than before, while the average household expenditure on transport grew by some 18 per cent. Farmer households also rose to the mid-level consumption group. In 2006 they spent more money especially on household appliances and furnishings, transport, and culture and recreation than in 2001.

The households of the unemployed and students consumed less than others. The relative consumption status of the households of the unemployed weakened clearly from before, because these households' consumption expenditure grew by only some 4 per cent during the reference period. Therefore also the differences grew between the households of the unemployed, who consume the least, and those of upper-level white-collar workers, who consume the most. It should also be noted that the households of the unemployed have saved in many other respects, but not in communication. Communication expenditure among the households of the unemployed grew by 53 per cent, while the average growth in communication expenditure was roughly 23 per cent. The relative consumption status of student households improved slightly during the reference period. The consumption expenditure of these households grew by roughly 15 per cent during the reference period and more money than before was used on household appliances and furnishings, clothing and footwear, and transport.

The relative consumption status of pensioners improved during 2001-2006; these households' consumption expenditure grew by one-fifth (20 per cent). Pensioner households significantly increased their spending on transport and communication. The increase in transport expenditure is probably due to the fact that a large number of working-age persons who used their own car for transport retired during the reference period. More pensioner households than before have Internet access, which explains the increase in spending on communication

Table 1. Consumption expenditure by reference person's socio-economic status and division in 2001 and 2006 (at 2006 prices, EUR/consumption unit)

Kulutusmenot Total Farmers Other own- 
account  
workers 
Upper-level  
white- collar 
workers 
Lower-level  
white-collar 
workers 
2001 2006 2001 2006 2001 2006 2001 2006 2001 2006
Consumption  
expenditure, total
17 525 19 975 16 112 19 645 21 899 26 672 24 948 27 456 19 220 20 935
Food and non- 
alcoholic beverages
2 253 2 485 2 707 2 667 2 611 2 936 2 539 2 799 2 264 2 513
Alcoholic beverages 
and tobacco 
447 495 261 226 488 614 558 579 451 551
Clothing and 
footwear
525 716 385 569 718 977 966 1 412 679 856
Housing and 
energy
5 298 5 654 5 087 6 282 6 311 6 990 6 094 6 231 5 391 5 331
Household furnishings, 
appliances and 
equipment
842 980 796 1 141 1 196 1 466 1 331 1 520 911 1 043
Health 696 734 494 447 727 872 693 695 596 624
Transport 2 541 3 006 2 489 3 202 3 743 4 355 4 774 4 760 3 037 3 366
Communication 459 564 516 612 589 657 551 650 539 617
Culture and 
recreation
1 699 2 188 1 526 2 112 2 070 3 234 2 774 3 489 1 901 2 239
Hotels, cafés 
and restaurants
871 846 394 430 1 004 1 237 1 504 1 722 1 153 1 035
Other expenditure 1 895 2 306 1 456 1 955 2 444 3 335 3 163 3 599 2 299 2 759
Households in 
population
2 381 500 2 455 000 51 032 44 060 138 336 144 379 381 417 409 653 385 549 394 313
Consumption units 
in household
1,5 1,5 2,1 2,1 1,8 1,8 1,7 1,7 1,5 1,6
 
Kulutusmenot Blue-collar 
workers
Students Pensioners Unemployed Others
2001 2006 2001 2006 2001 2006 2001 2006 2001 2006
Consumption  
expenditure, total
16 989 19 415 12 151 14 004 13 796 16 519 12 526 13 044 12 934 14 309
Food and non- 
alcoholic beverages
2 265 2 456 1 449 1 493 2 128 2 402 1 955 2 113 2 058 2 243
Alcoholic beverages 
and tobacco 
538 582 325 415 293 336 706 747 422 375
Clothing and 
footwear
502 645 399 548 253 369 248 182 356 603
Housing and 
energy
4 664 4 917 3 915 4 049 5 467 6 070 4 356 4 626 4 023 4 759
Household furnishings, 
appliances and 
equipment
756 904 449 595 646 732 533 510 439 643
Health 470 516 324 358 1 032 1 072 367 320 605 332
Transport 2 707 3 507 1 443 1 814 1 073 1 766 1 174 1 294 1 718 1 292
Communication 508 606 473 494 303 437 403 618 496 641
Culture and 
recreation
1 621 2 144 1 348 1 673 1 160 1 553 1 094 1 142 1 073 1 268
Hotels, cafés 
and restaurants
999 861 931 1 022 311 264 728 311 514 864
Other expenditure 1 958 2 277 1 095 1 544 1 131 1 518 962 1 181 1 231 1 290
Households in 
population
503 155 471 370 82 264 83 610 689 472 747 769 119 913 112 975 30 362 46 873
Consumption units 
in household
1,6 1,6 1,2 1,2 1,2 1,2 1,3 1,3 1,5 1,4

Consumption structure changing towards recreation and culture

Changes in the proportions of the 12 consumption divisions of total consumption have been slight during the five-year period. The proportion of housing, which includes also the imputed profit for owner-occupiers when compared with a rented dwelling of the same standard, has fallen by 2 percentage points, even though more money than before has been used on housing. The proportion of money spent on food and on restaurant and hotel services also fell during 2006. The proportion of expenditure on culture and recreation has grown most, and growth was also observed in the groups of transport, clothing, and other goods and services.

Figure 2. Consumption expenditure by division in 2001 and 2006 (at 2006 prices, EUR/consumption unit)

Source: Household Budget Survey 2006, Statistics Finland

Inquiries: Mr Juha Nurmela +358 9 1734 2548, Mr Marko Ylitalo +358 9 1734 3560, kulutus.tilastokeskus@tilastokeskus.fi

Director in charge: Ms Riitta Harala

Tables

Tables in databases


Last updated 16.1.2008

Referencing instructions:

Official Statistics of Finland (OSF): Households’ consumption [e-publication].
ISSN=2323-3028. 2006. Helsinki: Statistics Finland [referred: 31.10.2014].
Access method: http://www.tilastokeskus.fi/til/ktutk/2006/ktutk_2006_2007-12-19_tie_001_en.html.

Home > Statistics > Income and Consumption > Households’ consumption > 2006 > Own-account worker households' consumption has grown most in 2001-2006

Statistics

Income and Consumption

Households’ consumption

Link to rss-feed

Suomeksi På svenska Print version
Index| Site map| Feedback| Contact information
Etusivu| Förstasidan
Home Statistics Metadata Data collections Products and services News Statistics Finland
Statistikcentralen
Statistics Finland PalloTelephone +358 29 551 1000 PalloContact information PalloCopyrights and Terms of Use Pallo Feedback